The Best Yimou Zhang Movies Ranked And Where to Watch them

If you're looking for the best Yimou Zhang movies of all time then here is a definitive list. We rank every movie directed by Yimou Zhang based on their popularity score from IMDB from best to worst. Click on the ‘see more’ button to find out where to watch them in Australia covering all streaming services. In July 2021 there are 8 films in this list.

List of the Best Movies Directed by Yimou Zhang In Order of Popularity

  1. Hero
  2. Not One Less
  3. The Flowers of War
  4. Happy Times
  5. Riding Alone for Thousands of Miles
  6. Shadow
  7. The Great Wall
  8. A Woman, a Gun and a Noodle Shop

The top 8 Movies directed by Yimou Zhang

1. Hero

Rated: PG-13

7.9/10

In ancient China, before the reign of the first emperor, warring factions throughout the Six Kingdoms plot to assassinate the most powerful ruler, Qin. When a minor official defeats Qin's three principal enemies, he is summoned to the palace to tell Qin the story of his surprising victory.

2. Not One Less

Rated: G

7.7/10

In a remote mountain village, the teacher must leave for a month, and the mayor can find only a 13-year old girl, Wei Minzhi, to substitute. The teacher leaves one stick of chalk for each day and promises her an extra 10 yuan if there's not one less student when he returns. Within days, poverty forces the class troublemaker, Zhang Huike, to leave for the city to work. Minzhi, possessed of a stubborn streak, determines to bring him back. She enlists the 26 remaining pupils in earning money for her trip. She hitches to Jiangjiakou City and begins her search. The boy, meanwhile, is there, lost and begging for food. Minzhi's stubbornness may be Huike and the village school's salvation.

3. The Flowers of War

Rated: R

7.6/10

In 1937 China, during the second Sino-Japanese war, a mortician, John (Christian Bale) arrives at a Catholic church in Nanjing to prepare a priest for burial. Upon arrival he finds himself the lone adult among a group of convent girl students and prostitutes from a nearby brothel. When he finds himself in the unwanted position of protector of both groups from the horrors of the invading Japanese army, he discovers the meaning of sacrifice and honor.

4. Happy Times

Rated: PG

7.4/10

Zhao is an aging bachelor who hasn't been lucky in love. Thinking he has finally met the woman of his dreams, Zhao leads her to believe he is wealthy and agrees to a wedding far beyond his means. Zhao's best friend Li hatches the idea to raise the money by refurbishing an abandoned bus, which they will rent out by the hour--the Happy Times Hotel--to young couples starved for privacy. Unfortunately, this plan goes awry because Zhao is too old fashioned to allow the couples to leave the bus door closed. Meanwhile, Zhao's fiancee introduces him to her spoiled son and beautiful blind stepdaughter Wu Ying, whom she sees as a burden. To be rid of the girl, she insists that Zhao take her to the Happy Times Hotel and give her a job. Zhao reluctantly agrees, then creates a series of deceptions to keep the girl occupied, including setting her up as a masseuse and enlisting his friends to pretend to be her customers. Everything that is happening between Zhao and Wu is superficially about trickery, but gradually a very real empathy grows between the young woman and the old man.

5. Riding Alone for Thousands of Miles

Rated: PG

7.3/10

In a village of fishermen in Japan, Takata misses his son Kenichi, to whom he has been estranged for many years. When his daughter-in-law Rie tells him that Kenichi is sick in the hospital, she suggests Takata to come to Tokyo to visit his son in the hospital where he would have the chance to retie the relationship. However, Kenichi refuses to receive his father in his room, and Rie gives a videotape to Takata to know about the work of his son. Once at home, Takata sees a documentary in the remote village Lijiang, in the province of Younnan, about the passion of Kenichi, the Chinese opera, where the lead singer Li Jiamin promises to sing an important folk opera on the next year. When Rie calls Takata to tell that her husband has a terminal liver cancer, Takata decides to travel to Lijiang to shoot Li Jiamin singing the opera to give to Kenichi.

6. Shadow

Rated: Not Rated

7.0/10

Life and intrigue in an ancient Chinese court.

7. The Great Wall

Rated: PG-13

5.9/10

When a mercenary warrior (Matt Damon) is imprisoned within the Great Wall, he discovers the mystery behind one of the greatest wonders of the world. As wave after wave of marauding beasts besiege the massive structure, his quest for fortune turns into a journey toward heroism as he joins a huge army of elite warriors to confront the unimaginable and seemingly unstoppable force.

8. A Woman, a Gun and a Noodle Shop

Rated: R

5.6/10

At boss Wang's traditional Chinese noodle shop, a colourful and exotic Persian trader of arms introduces the shop owner's wife to the weapons of the West, and consequently, to mankind's greatest invention: the handgun. As a result, the woman excited with her newest acquisition that kills instantly, a brass, triple-muzzle top-break revolver, naturally, she will need more, however, the loud noise of the firearms' demonstration will inevitably attract a brigade of the local police force who will drop by for an investigation. Soon, grouchy old miser Wang will find out everything about his double-crossing wife's affair with the Inn's mincing weakling apprentice Li, and as the corpses begin piling up, it's going to be every man for himself and all for Wang's crammed strongbox.