All the best Documentary Movies Streaming in Australia in May 2021

If you're looking for the best Documentary Movies then you’ve come to the right place. In May 2021 there are around 3419 on offer on Australian streaming TV services. Below are the top 20 latest and greatest Documentary Movies available.

The top 20 best Documentary Movies Streaming in Australia by rating.

The top 20 latest Documentary Movies Streaming in Australia.

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The top 5 Documentary Movies Streaming in Australia.

David Attenborough: A Life on Our Planet

Rated: PG

9.0/10

One man has seen more of the natural world than any other. This unique feature documentary is his witness statement.

The Cove

Rated: PG-13

8.4/10

Richard O'Barry was the man who captured and trained the dolphins for the television show Flipper (1964). O'Barry's view of cetaceans in captivity changed from that experience when as the last straw he saw that one of the dolphins playing Flipper - her name being Kathy - basically committed suicide in his arms because of the stress of being in captivity. Since that time, he has become one of the leading advocates against cetaceans in captivity and for the preservation of cetaceans in the wild. O'Barry and filmmaker 'Louie Psihoyos (I)' go about trying to expose one of what they see as the most cruel acts against wild dolphins in the world in Taiji, Japan, where dolphins are routinely corralled, either to be sold alive to aquariums and marine parks, or slaughtered for meat. The primary secluded cove where this activity is taking place is heavily guarded. O'Barry and Psihoyos are well known as enemies by the authorities in Taiji, the authorities who will use whatever tactic to expel the two from Japan forever. O'Barry, Psihoyos and their team covertly try to film as a document of conclusive evidence this cruel behavior. They employ among others Hollywood cameramen and deep sea free divers. They also highlight what is considered the dangerous consumption of dolphin meat (due to its high concentration of mercury) which is often sold not as dolphin meat, and the Japanese government's methodical buying off of poorer third world nations for their support of Japan's whaling industry, that support most specifically at the International Whaling Commission.

Won't You Be My Neighbor?

Rated: PG-13

8.4/10

An exploration of the life, lessons, and legacy of iconic children's television host, Fred Rogers.

Before the Flood

Rated: PG

8.3/10

A look at how climate change affects our environment and what society can do to prevent the demise of endangered species, ecosystems and native communities across the planet.

13th

Rated: TV-MA

8.3/10

The film begins with the idea that 25 percent of the people in the world who are incarcerated are incarcerated in the U.S. Although the U.S. has just 5% of the world's population. "13th" charts the explosive growth in America's prison population; in 1970, there were about 200,000 prisoners; today, the prison population is more than 2 million. The documentary touches on chattel slavery; D. W. Griffith's film "The Birth of a Nation"; Emmett Till; the civil rights movement; the Civil Rights Act of 1964; Richard M. Nixon; and Ronald Reagan's declaration of the war on drugs and much more.